Law-Related Video Collection
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Feature Films: A - F G - P Q - Z

Instructional Films: A - F G - P Q - Z

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Showing results 41 to 50 of 96
Ten Commandments of the Mafia (DVD)
43 min.
- Instructional Video
Originally aired on the Discovery Channel, Nov. 16, 2008.
Summary:
Listen in as former Mafia members speak out for the first time about the codes that govern their criminal world. Chilling firsthand accounts from the mob members themselves tell of life on the inside and how their motto of cosa nostra -- "this thing of ours" -- ultimately fell victim to the American Dream. Learn what the rules of membership are, how they work, and what happened to mobsters when they questioned the "ten commandments of the Mafia."
Text, Sighs, and Videotape: Sample Conferences that Present Special Challenges to Teachers (VHS)
63 min.
- Instructional Video
Prepared for use in the training course for Legal Writing Teaching Assistants at the Law School of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Summary:
Ten sample conferences with students.
Credits:
Introduction by Mary Barnard Ray.
Therapeutic Jurisprudence in Practice (VHS)
58 min.
- Instructional Video
Produced by Western Michigan University in 2001.
Summary:
William G. Schma interviews attorney Richard Halpert.
They Chose Freedom (DVD)
88 min.
- Instructional Video
Four-part TV documentary on the history of political dissent in the USSR from the 1950s to the 1990s. Originally produced in 2005 as a television program and aired in 2005. In Russian and English.
Summary:
"They Chose Freedom" is narrated primarily through the interviews of dissidents themselves. The documentary tells the story of the Soviet dissident movement from its emergence in the late 1950s with the weekly public readings of banned poetry on Mayakovsky Square in Moscow. The development of samizdat, opposition demonstrations held in Moscow in 1965 and 1968, and the harsh repressions unleashed by Soviet authorities against dissenters (including forced psychiatric "treatment", prison camps and deportations), are all part of the film's narrative.
Credits:
Written and produced by Russian historian and television journalist Vladimir V. Kara-Murza.
This Honorable Court (VHS)
2 videocassettes (60 min. each)
- Instructional Video
Produced by WETA-TV, 1988.
Summary:
A two-part series on the Supreme Court, its history and a step-by-step narrative of how cases arrive, are considered, decided and reported.
Contents:
1. A history of the court
2. Inside the Supreme Court
Credits:
Reported by Paul Duke; producers, Steve York, Berry Richards; director, Steve York; executive producer, Ricki Green.
Thomas E. Fairchild: A Judge's Legacy (DVD & VHS)
90 min.
- Instructional Video
18th Thomas E. Fairchild lecture, University of Wisconsin Law School, Apr. 21, 2006.
Summary:
Judge Lefkow, who was one of Judge Fairchild's clerks, spoke in honor of her mentor. The talk took the form of a "walk down memory lane," in which Judge Lefkow shared her own memories of working with Judge Fairchild as well as the memories of her fellow clerks, who had sent their contributions to her in advance. Judge Lefkow's two current clerks, Jordan Russell and Jed Roher, stood with her as the three of them gave a dramatic presentation, taking the voices of Judge Fairchild and his clerks, many of whom were in the audience at the well-attended event. Roher, who read the lines of Judge Fairchild, is a third-year student at the UW Law School. As the lecture was about to begin, Judge Fairchild himself entered the room to a standing ovation.
Credits:
Lecture by the Honorable Joan Humphrey Lefkow of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois.
Thoughts on How the Legal System Treats Jurors (DVD)
- Instructional Video
Address given at University of Wisconsin Law School, April 18, 2008.
Summary:
Patrick J. Fitzgerald, whose work as special prosecutor probing the leak of CIA operative Valerie Plame's identity drew national attention, spoke on the legal system's treatment of jurors.
Credits:
Presenter: Patrick J. Fitzgerald.
The Times of Harvey Milk (DVD)
1 hr. 28 min.
- Instructional Video
Originally produced as a documentary in 1984.
Winner, 1985 Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.
Summary:
This documentary examines the political life of the self-proclaimed "Mayor Of Castro Street," N.Y. stockbroker turned San Francisco activist Harvey Milk, the first openly gay politician elected to public office in California. Milk was elected to a City Supervisor position in the '70s, when a successful gay politician was an anomaly, but Milk made the most of his brief time in power. When Dan White killed Milk and Mayor George Moscone, the loss experienced by Milk's supporters was profound. White robbed the gay-rights movement of a charismatic leader and eloquent voice, but he accidentally gave it something a smart political operative like Milk would surely have appreciated the power and value of: a bona fide martyr.
Contents:
DISC 1: The times of Harvey Milk -- Harvey's political will -- Mayor of Castro Street -- A new kind of politics -- Campaign for supervisor -- Something new at city hall -- Advancing the issues -- San Francisco's Gay Rights Bill -- Proposition 6 -- Road to victory -- Dan White resigns -- Tragedy at city hall -- Candlelight march -- The trial -- "He got away with murder" -- Hope -- Closing credits -- Color bars -- Postscript -- Trailer.
DISC 2: Featurettes Jon Else (20 min); Two films, one legacy (23 min.); Harvey Milk recordings: "Out of the bars and into the streets" [audio] (14 min.); Texas Gay Conference Five [audio] (48 min.); Harvey Milk speaks out [video] (3 min.); Anti-Proposition 6 election night party [audio] (10 min.); Harvey Milk's political will [audio] (13 min.); Director's research tapes [video]: Scott Smith (80 min.); Bob Ross (53 min.); Amber Hollibaugh (44 min.); Cleve Jones (30 min.); Lillian Sing (15 min.); Hank Wilson (10 min.); From the Castro to the Oscars: Premiere at the Castro Theatre (8 min.); A night at the Oscars (3 min.); The Dan White case: News clips (4 min.); Panel discussion (30 min.); Harry Britt, Milk's successor (10 min.); Candlelight memorial (7 min.)
Credits:
Directed by Robert Epstein; produced by Richard Schmiechen; narration writers, Judith Coburn and Carter Wilson; edited by Deborah Hoffmann and Robert Epstein; cinematography by Frances Reid; original music composed and performed by Mark Isham; research by Wendy Zheutlin and Mellissa Katsus.
To Save the Land and People (VHS)
57 min.
- Instructional Video
Summary:
Discusses the history and impact of strip mining in Kentucky. Focuses on actions by people directly affected by mining on both sides of the question: miners and farmers. Highlights the evolving legislation imposed to control strip mining and enabling newer methods such as "mountain top removal."
Credits:
Directed by Anne Lewis; associate director, Buck Maggard; sound and editing, Anne Lewis; executive producer, Dee Davis.
Tough Decisions: Defending the Homeland (DVD)
27 min.
- Instructional Video
Produced by WFYI in partnership with the Indiana University School of Law-Indianapolis and the IU School of Public and Environmental Affairs.
Summary:
This simulation of a terrorism event forces a new generation of global leaders to develop innovative counter-terrorism tactics and strategies in order to disrupt terrorist activities, while restoring public safety and maintaining First Amendment rights.
Credits:
Edited by David Tarr.

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